Permie Entrepreneurs Are Go #5

Welcome back to another week jammed packed with actionable resources for permie entrepreneurs, ecopreneurs and regenerative businesses!

This week we’re diving into understanding not only the world around us, but how we fit into it and work with it – rather than against it. This includes unpacking how to take inspiration from our surroundings to feel more ourselves, how to look for patterns to mimic for our own success, and how to work with produce to build a viable enterprise.

Without further ado, let’s explore how self care, entrepreneurial strategy, and permaculture can help to build your viable regenerative enterprises!


Self Care

adam_haritan_permie_emmy

Reading Your Body, Reading the Land by Adam Haritan (Good Life Revival)

Creator of Learn Your Land, Adam Haritan talks extensively about how healing your body and healing the land are one and the same. Drawing from his own experiences of feeling unhealthy and unmotivated, Adam speaks about how making a connection with the land around him has helped him to feel more at home and more at peace with himself. Following his career in a metal band, Adam studied nutritional science.

Despite his efforts to improve his own health. Adam found limits to conventional science, finding time in nature and self-learning provided him a more fulfilling route to holistic healing. Learning both mushroom and plant identification simultaneously, Adam has found solace in connecting with kindred spirits and in connecting to the larger landscapes around him.

Lessons from Adam Haritan

  1. Find the diet that’s best for you – While Adam has tried out vegan diets and been proffered a series of miracle eating habits, he found that through self-learning and eating natively to his community, he feels distinctly more healthy and happier. While he supports learning from academia and listening to others opinions, ultimately everyone is different and you need to find what works for you to eat a sustainably healthy diet.
  2. Knowing plants makes you feel at home – When we start to learn about the nature around us, we’re not only able to forage for a much healthier diet, we can also connect with the land we’re on – rather than just being a tourist. For Adam, he says this connection brings him a much better sense of home that he craved so desperately when he was younger.
  3. You can’t learn alone – While self-learning is very valuable, we need to recognise that even the books and literature we draw from was contributed by others. Go out and find like-minded people, clubs to join, meetups to attend. You’ll learn so much from others who are so desperate to share.
  4. Develop a strong enough ‘why’ – In order to truly stick with your goals in a sustainable way, there has to be a strong enough purpose as to why you do what you do. When you find that passion, you find the fuel to drive it to become something bigger than yourself.

Adam offers a great course on foraging mushrooms, which you can sign up to here –

Foraging Wild Mushrooms


Entrepreneurial Strategy

Blueprint for Success by Tony Robbins (Entrepreneurs on Fire)

Tony Robbins doesn’t really need an introduction – or he shouldn’t – but in case you don’t know, he’s possibly the most successful business growth developer and motivator in the world today, as well as being a kick-ass entrepreneur in his own right. Aside from building billion-dollar companies and writing business bestsellers, Robbins also does a great amount of philanthropy, helping to free women from trafficking and providing a billion free meals to the needy over 10 years.  

In this podcast, he gives a blueprint to his success, breaking down why and how traditional education fails us, and how to become a self-learner that propels oneself TOWARD  your vision. This talk brings incredible insights into how he came to succeed and the ethos you should have driving your attitude.

Lessons from Tony Robbins

  1. Leaders are readers – Self-education is everything. Those who can self-learn are able to use the wealth of resources around them to solve any problems they come across. If you’re not learning, you’re stagnant.
  2. Find the patterns – Patterns are everything – as we know from permaculture. Find the patterns to why people failure, and avoid them. Find the patterns to why people are succeeding, and copy them. Objectively analyse the patterns in your own life and define better ones that model behaviour you want, and break the patterns that don’t.
  3. Leaders anticipate, losers react – Don’t wait for things to happen to you and then try to manage the crisis. Look at the potential outcomes, using every experience as a learning curve. In this respect, we can predict the outcomes of certain events, in order to better prepare ourselves or steer the ship in the most prosperous direction.
  4. Fear is paralysing – If you’re frightened of what might happen, you’ll never do anything. Everyone will fail – it is inevitable when you’re trying to find your way. The fear of failure will keep you from putting a foot forward. Only through striking out will you gain experience – whether it be experience of mistake not to repeat, or experience of success to pattern.
  5. You need a higher purpose – Human don’t need much to be happy on an individual level. What do you really need? A good beer and good meal and a dime in your pocket? In order to keep driving your regenerative business, you need to have a higher goal as to why you’re doing it – it has to be something that will drive change on a level bigger than you.

Tony’s newest book of excellent advice on entrepreneurial acceleration can be found here:

Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook


Permaculture

Growing Tomatoes for Profit by Conor Crickmore (Permaculture Voices)

Conor Crickmore is an educator and expert in small scale farming. Pioneer of Neversink Farm, Conor prides himself on large and small scale changes made on his farm that contribute to a fractal system that works both on as a whole and as systemic arms within it. Along with his wife, he’s grossing $350,000 a year with his farm, while also producing a myriad of excellent courses to teach future small-scale farmers.

This podcast delves into the specifics of growing tomatoes for profit – both practically and economically. For those of us who have tried to grow veggies, particularly tomatoes, for profit – you will have encountered hurdles and questions regarding species selection, marketing, grafting/seed, and diseases. Conor dives right in there, uncovering all his secrets of how he not only grows tomatoes successfully, but turns a profit through his entrepreneurial skill.

Lessons from Conor Crickmore

  1. Grow out of season – It’s pretty easy to extend seasons and to grow tomatoes when the market is being flooded by big producers. This is the best time to make profit and increase your customer base as you won’t experience so much competition.
  2. Limit variety – While tomatoes come in all shapes and sizes, with multicoloured heirlooms catching our fancy, often customers will get choice blindness if offered too many options. Conor reduces his selection to 3 colours of heirlooms, a couple of cherry varieties and a beef steak. This encourages easier choice while also reducing workload when growing as there are fewer plant specifications to work to.
  3. Think about marketing first – Considering the tomatoes you grow, your target audience, what sells best, how you’ll present them at market, and how they’ll be packaged will help you to sell better. This will help in the picking and packing process, as well as working out how to upsell with other veggies on the day.
  4. Don’t throw too much risk in your system – Conor doesn’t actually make his own potting soil as he prefers to be sure of the exact mix he is getting. Equally, he grafts all his tomatoes for longer seasons and resistance to root disease. These observations and changes to his system means he’s reducing risk.

If you’re interested in learning more from Conor, check out his highly-acclaimed online courses here:

Neversink Courses


Permie Emmy’s Weekly Wild Card

This week’s wild card is an oldy but a goody. Extremely poigniant in regards to Extinction Rebellion, who are fighting to show our unsustainable system for what it is. 

What is it you ask? Well here’s a great insight.

The Story of Stuff

This is a concisely explained and well-illustrated description of the linear system operating in our world and how that linear system is destroying the planet we live on. Confined by consumerism, we’re extracting resources, polluting through production, using up through consumerism, and polluting again with waste.

Not only is this completely unsustainable, mathematically it doesn’t work out well for us in the end. Both the people and the planet embroiled in this man-made system are being harmed and are threatened with extinction. The crux is that, as we created this particular fairground ride, we can also create a better one that’s regenerative, that puts back the resources we use by conscious consideration or regeneration.

Lessons from the Story of Stuff

  1. One third of natural resources have been depleted in the last 3 decades – When we consider this (I think now it’s about 50% in 4 decades), we realise how little time we have left before we deplete everything that sustains us; especially when we consider that consumption is rising and so is the population.
  2. If you don’t buy or own stuff, you don’t have value – The system is created to force people to buy and own all kinds of things they don’t need, replacing them at a rapid rate to keep that system growing. Those who don’t buy into the system have a very small voice and are inevitably buried by those that perpetuate it.
  3. The system externalises true costs – The real costs of extraction, production, exploitation, and pollution aren’t captured in the reporting of the system. With many factories and production processes moved to developing countries, indigenous land and economies are eroded, leaving the most vulnerable people to be forced to work in unhealthy environments – further reducing their prosperity.
  4. The system was DESIGNED After WW2, Victor LeBow, a retail analyst, (among others) designed this very system encouraging consumerism as a way of life to feed the economy by influencing the people to burn up and replace resources to force expansion. If it was designed so recently, it can be redesigned again.
  5. Our waste methods produce the world’s most toxic man-made chemical – Dioxin is mostly produced from burning waste in incinerators. If we know this is the world’s most toxic chemical, why work with a system that allows its production at unprecedented and ever growing rates? It makes no sense. Regenerative businesses must seek to reduce waste and bypass this system with new methods of reinvesting waste back into the system – there’s no such thing as waste, just things in the wrong place.

You can check out more of what The Story of Stuff Project are doing by heading to their website.


I hope this week has been another inspiring catalogue to help boost your entrepreneurial journey and encourage ecopreneurship both in your head and in your hands.

Permie Emmy x

If you’d like to donate toward getting my entrepreneurial journey on the road to building a regenerative business incubator permaculture site, please donate here:

I’d Like To Help!

If you’d like to find out more about what I’m aiming to do with the money, you can read my blog about my plans for a regenerative business incubator.

Advertisements

The Mystery of the Wilting Tomatoes

This week there was a little bit of an issue. A whole row of my tomatoes started to die and I really couldn’t work out why.

wilting_tomatoes
Wilting tomatoes from unwanted guests

I have spent the last week or so trellising everything to give the tomatoes support for the next period where they start to really burst outward and upward. Equally, I have been spreading charcoal on the beds as well.

My first reaction was that one of these two actions had caused the tomatoes to wilt. However, like with all systems, we need to look for the feedback loops, and while this may have caused some disruption through root tear or chemical imbalances, it still led to the question of why only one row was affected.

I was completely stumped, so I went to my team. One of the great things, as I’ve mentioned before, with working with local guys, is that they know their land and they tend to know any problems that are occurring. While I don’t know the name of the specific issue, having observed the plants with me, they showed me how the plant was turning brown from the root upward, demonstrating that the issue is within the soil. With our mix of broken Spanglish, they managed to get across to me that it is some form of parasitic fungus which attacks the roots. It’s common here, especially when planting non-native species such as this.

Bug_Eaten_Beans
Bug Eaten Non-Native Beans

My response to this was two-fold. On the first hand, I made a neem, chilli and garlic insecticide. The ingredients are left to steep in water for a day or two and then sprayed on the plants. This will help to keep that parasitic fungus back in the same way that it keeps insects back.

Natural_Insecticide
Natural Insecticide

Secondly, with a more long-term look, I tried to consider how to keep this issue from returning. Fungus tends to indicate high levels of carbon, and the rice husks on the bed are adding carbon to the soil. Where I am planting nitrogen-fixing cover crops in this area, they haven’t spread very far yet, meaning the likelihood is that the rice husks are unbalancing the system somewhat with too much carbon. In response to this, I sprayed a home-made nitrogen fertilizer that I had previously been fermenting.

Natural_fertiliser
Natural nitrogen fertiliser

For this, I walked around the property and pulled leaves and fruit from as many different leguminous plants as I could find. I placed them in a five gallon bucket, filled with water. I placed banana leaves on the surface to keep everything under the water (to stop it rotting) and I popped the lid on for two weeks to let it brew. Boy, did it stink when I opened that lid. Hopefully, however, it will help to give those plants a boost and keep that fungus back.

Like this? Sign up to my Patreon for more exclusive content, how-tos, insights into my current designs, and a backstage look at all the lessons I’m learning.